Author: Kristina Busse

Kristina Busse (independent scholar) has been an active media fan and has published a variety of essays on fan fiction and fan culture. Kristina is coeditor, with Karen Hellekson, of Fan Fiction and Fan Communities in the Age of the Internet (2006), and founding coeditors of Transformative Works and Cultures, an online-only international peer-reviewed journal about fan cultures and fan works. You can find her here.

In the Beginning Was the Word

Recent episodes of Doctor Who and Supernatural take up the narrative of storyteller as God, raising questions about our fascination with the auteur.

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The Cost of Interfaces

Boycotting Facebook is getting harder, particularly because of the complete invisibility and unawareness of the nature of the social networking site to its members.

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How to be an Independent Scholar

Being an independent scholar means that research and academic writing must be redefined as pleasure: I research instead of watching TV or reading a book; I write instead of meeting with friends or going shopping; I edit and do professional activities at the cost of my family time.

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On academic collaboration

Collaborations are frowned upon in the humanities: monographs are still the prime currency in tenure and promotion, and our training doesn’t prepare or encourage us for the give and take that collaborative writing demands. For me that’s a shame, because I love writing with others.

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Minstrel Show in a Three-Day Stubble of a City

The second season shapes up to reconnect the city with the world around it: New Orleaneans are confronted with outsider views of the city as becomes clear in Delmond’s argument about New Orleans music with fellow jazz lovers and Janette’s conversation with her fellow cooks after reading Alan Richman’s devastating review.

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The Unicorn That Roared

I know that even as the bad job market is a haunting reality for most grad students, it’s also a gamble every one is clearly willing to take, deep down surely believing that they will beat the odds. After all, everyone whom they encounter and interact with has done so, right?

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Media, Mothers, and Me

CBS’s The Good Wife doesn’t shy away from the challenges its protagonist faces in negotiating her adult life, something more than we tend to expect to see on television, where story lines often trade in emotionally false dichotomies.

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Transformation, Adaptation, Derivation? Moffat’s Sherlock and the Art of AUs

In the end, while individual plot points, objects, and places are important for fans to recognize, the most successful approach seems to come about when the writer extrapolates the character’s underlying identity, exploring those aspects that remain the same in the new setting, and how they will manifest.

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