Tag: Orson Welles

From Mercury to Mars: The Shadow of the Great Detective: Orson Welles and Sherlock Holmes on the Air

The Antenna-Sounding Out! series From Mercury to Mars: Orson Welles on Radio after 75 Years continues on into the new year with a post on Sounding Out! from A. Brad Schwartz about the influence of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes stories on Orson Welles’ radio work.

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From Mercury to Mars: Devil’s Symphony: Orson Welles’ “Hell on Ice” as Eco-Sonic Critique

The Antenna-Sounding Out! series From Mercury to Mars: Orson Welles on Radio after 75 Years continues today with a new post on Sounding Out! from Jacob Smith about the Mercury Theatre’s 1938 radio play “Hell On Ice” as a proto-environmental critique that is as relevant today as it was 75 years ago.

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From Mercury to Mars: War of the Worlds and the Invasion of Media Studies

In this latest post in our From Mercury to Mars series, Josh Shepperd discusses the “War of the Worlds” broadcast as a foundational subject for intellectual history and, as the subject of social research like Hadley Cantril’s The Invasion from Mars, one of the events that legitimated the very study of media.

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#WOTW75 — It’s Time for “War of the Worlds”!

A full rundown of all the information you’ll need to know to participate in tonight’s #WOTW75 collective listening experiment, commemorating the 75th anniversary of Orson Welles’ and the Mercury Theatre’s “War of the Worlds” radio broadcast.

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From Mercury to Mars: Orson Welles’s Dracula

The Antenna-Sounding Out! ongoing series From Mercury to Mars: Orson Welles on Radio after 75 Years continues with a new post from Debra Rae Cohen on the inaugural broadcast of the original Mercury series, Welles’s fascinating version of Bram Stoker’s Dracula.

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From Mercury to Mars: War of the Worlds as Residual Radio

In Antenna’s first post in the From Mercury to Mars: Orson Welles on Radio after 75 Years collaborative series with Sounding Out!, Eleanor Patterson explores how it is that we are still listening to the 1938 radio broadcast of “War of the Worlds” 75 years later, and in what ways its discursive and material circulation demonstrates the residual presence of radio drama in our media culture.

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